Atlantis, Past and Future

On the shoreline of the Welsh coast near Borth, violent winter storms caused remnants of an ancient kingdom and forest to emerge from the sea, lending some physical evidence to underpin the area’s deluge myth of Cantre’r Gwaelod, a sunken realm and forest long said to lie beneath Cardigan Bay. The Cantre’r Gwaelod legend says…

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Watery Treasure

Draining swamps and wetlands has, over the course of human civilization, been seen as a way to grasp land from the greedy waters that cover most of the Earth’s surface. Add to this that much of the drained, reclaimed land is then conveniently located on prime river or coastal property, and the terrestrial inclination to…

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Carpenter Flight

I opened my office window the other day to find a row of tiny earthen mounds, little bubbles separated by straight walls. I thought it was an odd collection of dirt that had blown in through the small ventilation hole in the wooden frame. Or maybe a small ant colony, since we get a variety…

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Green & Red Bounty, Unfurling

A few shots from the garden as it grows. I don’t have much of a green thumb when it comes to the kitchen garden, but watching each vegetable flower and then grow round has been a pleasure. The first tomato. A long vine with tiny potimarrons, my favorite pumpkin for autumn soups and pies. The…

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Solstice Run

A stunning summer solstice day, some of it spent in the garden staking up tomatoes and peas, some of it spent sitting together, some of it spent in blissful afternoon napping. And some of it spent on a good 7 km run. The summer solstice is a bittersweet pleasure. The beginning of summer; when the first…

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Horses, Railroads, Seeds and War

I learned a few new words today while on a trip down a research rabbit hole. And as is so often the case, I can’t remember how I first got to the interesting blog, Cryptoforestry. But get there I did, and that’s when I fell down the hole. The first word I learned is polemobotany,…

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Shape Shifting

Conservation strategies have been historically focused on getting an overview of the species in a region, and then trying to protect those species that are endangered. I’ve written often before about how important a top predator species can be to the overall health and biodiversity of an ecosystem. For example, the presence of wolves in a…

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Future Jam

This is the result of my Cherry Diversion the other day, a bowl of fat cherries that I turned into a runny but delectable cherry jam which I am redubbing a cherry coulis so the runniness will sound intentional. It’s not thin liquid, it just doesn’t quite sit still once put on bread. It’s got…

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Ringed Recognition

We were looking at some old pictures the other days, and came upon this one of a kid in the ringed T-shirt. Without even looking at the date, we knew right away it was from the late 1950s or early 1960s. Why? Because just a picture of the ringed T-shirts of our youth calls up…

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The Whale in the Water

The Dutch painting here, by Hendrick van Anthonissen, has led a double life. In its original form, it showed an object of fascination: a freshly stranded whale at during the mid-17th century. There was a widespread public interest in these large creatures around this time, which saw an expanding Dutch whaling industry and widespread use…

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